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Tables and Charts

 

Tables

 

Introduction

In all slides we have used so far, we were typing text into text boxes. A table is another type of object that receives text. The major feature of a table is that it arranges its data into boxes called cells. To do this, a table is made of vertical arrangements called columns that intersect with horizontal arrangements called rows. The vertical arrangements usually serve as categories of information. The horizontal parts are usually called records. Based on this, a table can be represented as follows:

Table Illustration

Normally, this is the way it is done in databases. In Microsoft PowerPoint tables, there is no rule to put categories in columns or records in rows. This means that you can reverse the roles of columns and rows.

The intersection of a column and a row is called a cell. To provide feed back for the roles of columns, their top cells, also called column headers, can be formatted with bold characters and optionally a different background. Here is an example:

A table with indicative column headers

To get a table in a slide, Microsoft PowerPoint provides a special slide with a table that you can simply fill out.

Practical Learning Practical Learning: Adding a Table Slide

  1. Start Microsoft PowerPoint and open the College Park Auto Shop1 presentation
     
    College Park Auto Shop - Slide 1
  2. If necessary, in the lower-left section of the screen, click the Normal View button.
    In the left frame, click the button of the number 4 slide
  3. To add a new slide, press Ctrl + M
  4. To add a new slide, on the main menu, click Insert -> New Slide...
  5. In the Apply Layout window, scroll down to the Other Layout section
  6. In the Other Layout section, click the Title and Table button
  7. Type Company Business Analysis as the title of the slide

Table Creation

To organize its information, a table is made of columns and rows. This also means that these would be the first two pieces of information you must provide to initiate a table. As stated already, the columns are the vertical arrangements while the rows are the horizontal records. To specify these numbers, if you double-click the Double Click To Add Table button on a Table slide, the Insert Table Table dialog box would appear:

This allows you to specify the starting number of columns and the starting number of slides. The default values are set to 2 each. To change these numbers, you can either click the corresponding text box, delete the value and type the new one, or you can click the up and down arrows of the spin button. After specify the values, you can click OK.

If you find out that you need more columns or more rows, you can use the Draw Table tool of the Tables and Borders toolbar. It allows you to draw horizontal or vertical lines. Another technique you can use to add columns and/or rows consists of clicking the Table button on the Tables and Borders toolbar and selecting an option on its menu:

Practical Learning Practical Learning: Creating a Table

  1. In the body of the slide, double-click the button on top of the Double Click To Add Table line
  2. In the Insert Table dialog box, change the Number of Columns spin button to 3 and change the Number of Rows to 4
     
  3. Click OK
    If the Mouse cursor appears with the Draw Table tool, on the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the Draw Table button to dismiss the tool
  4. Click the middle top cell in the table
  5. Type 2002 and press Tab
  6. Type 2003
  7. To add another column to the right side of the 2003 column, while the caret is in that column, on the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the Table button and click Insert Column To The Right
  8. Click 2003 and press Tab
  9. In the new top empty cell, type 2004 and press Tab
  10. Complete the table with the following values:
     
      2002 2003 2004
    Advertising $124000 $175000 $55000
    Equipment $65000 $18800 $42500
    Research and Development $38700 $82500 $44700
     
  11. While the caret is in the last (lower-right) cell, to add a new row, press Tab and complete the last row with the following values:
     
      2002 2003 2004
    Advertising $124000 $175000 $55000
    Equipment $65000 $18800 $42500
    Research and Development $38700 $82500 $44700
    Community Involvement $8500 $42500 $75600
  12. Save the presentation

Table Formatting

A table is mainly made of text. By default, all sections of text in a table use the same font name and the same font style. You can change the font characteristics of only one word, the content of one cell or the text in all cells.

To change the font of text that is part of a cell, you can right-click that cell and click Font... To change the font of only one word, one whole column, a group of columns, one whole row, a group of rows, or the whole table, first make the necessary selection. Then, right-click the selection and click Font...

By default, all text in a table uses the same color. As mentioned already, you can format the column to appear differently. This also applies to their background. To change the background of one cell, you can right-click it and click Borders and Fill... To change the background of one column, a group of columns, one row, a group of rows, or the whole table, first make the necessary selection. Then, right-click the selection and click Borders and Fill...

Practical Learning Practical Learning: Formatting a Table

  1. In the table, click 2002
  2. Press and hold Shift
  3. Click 2004 and release Shift
  4. On the Formatting toolbar, click the Center button Center
  5. On the Formatting toolbar, click the Bold button Bold
  6. On the Drawing toolbar, click the arrow of the Font Color button and click the white button
  7. Click Advertising. Press and hold Shift. Click Involvement and release Shift
  8. As the white color was the last action, press F4 to paint them in white
  9. On the Formatting toolbar, click the arrow of the Font Size combo box and select 24
  10. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click Center Vertically
  11. Click 2002. Press and hold Shift. Click 2004 and release Shift
  12. Press F4 to repeat the last action
  13. On the table, click $124000. Press and hold Shift. Click $75600 and release Shift
  14. Press F4 to repeat the last action
  15. While the numbers are still selected, on the Formatting toolbar, click the Align Right button Align Right
  16. In the table, click 2002. Press and hold Shift. Click 2004 and release Shift
  17. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the arrow of the Fill Color button and click More Fill Colors
  18. In the Colors dialog box, click Custom and set the color to Red=50, Green=50, Blue=255
  19. Click OK
  20. Click the empty cell in the top-left corner of the table. Press and hold Shift. Click Involvement and release Shift
  21. Press F4 to repeat the last action
  22. Click the empty cell in the top-left corner of the table. Press and hold Shift. Click $75600 and release Shift
  23. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the arrow of the Border Width combo box and select 21/4 pt
  24. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the Border Color button and select the white color
  25. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the arrow of the Outside Borders button and select All Borders
  26. Drag the right border of each column to make the table fit in the slide
     
  27. Save the presentation

Charts

 

Introduction

A chart is a graphic object that is used to represent numeric values instead of words. A good chart meticulously formatted can highly enhance a presentation. Before creating a chart, you should plan it. This means that you should prepare the numbers that would be used. There are two pieces of information you should have before starting: The numbers that you want to represent and the type of chart you want to use.

To get a chart in a slide, you have two main options. You can use the Chart slide, which is a slide whose body would be made of a chart. Alternatively, to have a chart as part of a slide that also contains text, you can use either the Text & Chart slide or the Chart & Text slide.

Practical Learning Practical Learning: Introducing Charts

  1. In the lower-left section of the screen, click the Slide View button. In the left frame, click the button of the number 6 slide
  2. To add a new slide, on the main menu, click Insert -> New Slide...
  3. In the Apply Layout window, scroll down to the Other Layout section
  4. Click the Title and Chart button (it is the last)
  5. Type Comparative Analysis as the title of the slide

Creating a Chart

To help with charts, Microsoft Office provides all the necessary means. For example, in order to generate a chart, you must provide a table of numbers. This table is provided as a datasheet to you. All you have to do is to fill it up.

Practical Learning Practical Learning: Creating a Chart

  1. In the body of the slide, double-click the Double Click To Add Chart line
  2. Click 1st Qtr and type 2002
  3. Press Tab and type 2003
  4. Press Tab and type 2004
  5. Right-click column header D and click Delete
  6. Click East and type Advertising
  7. Press Tab and type 124000
  8. Press Tab and type 175000
  9. Press Tab and type 55000
  10. Right-click 2 on the left side of West and click Delete
  11. Right-click 2 on the left side of North and click Delete
     
  12. Click somewhere in the body of the slide to close the Datasheet window

Characteristics of a Chart

As stated already, a chart is used to graphical represent numeric values. After creating a sheet of these values, you may have new numbers you want to add to the chart. You may want to change the values or words on the chart. You may want to change the appearance of an aspect of the chart. All these operations are possible. To make a change to the chart, you can first double-click it.

As seen above, the numbers used by the chart are created in a datasheet. If you want to add a new column, display the Datasheet window. To add a column to the right side of the existing columns, simply click a cell on the right side and type the desired value(s). To insert a new column between two existing ones, right-click a column and click Insert.

To add a new row of data, click a cell under the existing ones and start typing.

After creating the chart, to change the appearance of the graphic objects that make up the chart, you can right-click one of them and click

Practical Learning Practical Learning: Formatting a Chart

  1. On the slide, double-click the chart
  2. Click the cell under Advertising, type Equipment and press Tab, complete the datasheet as follows:
     
  3. Click somewhere on the slide to close the datasheet
     
  4. Save the presentation

The Sections of a Chart

To present its information, a chart is made or various sections.

The Parts of a Chart

Most or everyone of these aspects can be hidden, displayed or changed. To perform any action on these parts, you can double-click the chart.

To represent its numbers to the user, a chart draws some geometric figures, depending on the type of chart. These figures can be rectangles, pie slices, triangles, cones, etc. By default, the chart engine uses some selected colors from its own list. You can either change these colors or apply some preset drawings available. You can also design and use any custom picture to paint the chart's shapes.

To format the geometric figures of a chart, you can right-click one of them and click Format Data Series.

When a chart draws its graphics, if the data is made of different types of values, the chart engine uses a different column for each type of value to differentiate them. Because this can become confusing, a small box is created as a guide. This box, by default displayed to the right of the chart, is called a legend.

In the legend, a small painted square displays a color and a label on its right. The color is one of the colors used on the graphics of the chart. The label indicates what that part represents

By default, when a chart is drawn, it is equipped with shapes and a separate legend. If you want, you can display the value of each part and possibly its name close to it. This is done through a label. On a large chart, a label can also be used in the absence of a legend. In fact, you can delete a legend and simply make use of a label.

Labels are created using the same approach as we have done with the legends and titles.

The wall is in fact the background of a chart. By default, it is painted white. You can use a different color to paint it, a design pattern or a picture to cover it.

Practical Learning Practical Learning: Formatting a Chart's Shapes

  1. To format the chart, double-click it
  2. Right-click the most right (green) box and click Format Data Series...
  3. In the Patterns property page of the Format Data Series dialog box, the Brown color (1st row - 2nd column) and click Fill Effects
  4. In the Gradient property page of the Fill Effect dialog box, click the One Color radio button and move the slider slightly to the left
  5. In the Shading Styles section, click the Vertical radio button
  6. In the Variants section, click the button in the 2nd column - 2nd row
     
  7. Click OK
  8. Click OK
  9. Right-click the legend box that is positioned to the right of the chart and click Format Legend...
  10. In the Format Legend dialog box, click the Placement property page 
  11. Click Bottom and click OK
  12. Right-click the white area in the chart and click Format Walls...
  13. In the Format Walls dialog box, in the Area section, click Fill Effects
  14. In the Fill Effects dialog box, click the Texture property page
  15. In the Texture section, click the box in 2nd column - 2nd row
  16. Click OK twice
  17. Complete the chart as you see fit and click an empty area in the slide to see the result
     
  18. Save the presentation

Organization Chart

 

Introduction

An organization chart is a series of pictures or boxes that can be used to display the hierarchical overview of a company. For example, if you go to a governmental agency or a corporate office, on the wall, you may see the picture of the highest ranking representative of the institution, such as the picture of the governor. Under it, you would see the picture of the second ranking officers. Under them, you may see the highest people who respond to them. Although those are usually simplistic, an organizational chart can provide more information than that.

You also can create an organization chart and add it to your presentation.

Practical Learning Practical Learning: Introduction Organizational Charts

  1. Display the Slide View. In the left frame, click the button of slide number 2
  2. To add a new slide, on the main menu, click Insert -> New Slide...
  3. In the Apply Layout window, scroll down to the Other Layout section
  4. In the Other Layout section, click the Title and Diagram or Organization Chart button
  5. Type Company Organization as the title of the new slide

Creation of an Organization Chart

Microsoft PowerPoint allows you to easily create an organization chart using a software product that ships with Microsoft Office. This software is not installed with the default installation. This means that you can install it using a Custom installation or when needed, Microsoft PowerPoint would let you know that it is not installed.

Practical Learning Practical Learning: Creating an Organizational Chart

  1. To create the organization chart, in the slide double-click the Double Click To Add Org Chart line. You may receive a message box informing you that the feature is not installed:
     

     
    In this case, if you have the Microsoft CD or DVD, put it in the appropriate drive and click Yes. If you don't have it, click No and skip the exercise
     
  2. In the Microsoft Organization Chart window, if the top Type Name Here line is not selected (it should be automatically selected already), then click the Type Name Here line in the top green box.
    Type Paul Maestro
  3. Select the Type Title Here text and type Chief Executive Officer (CEO)
  4. Click in the most left text box and type Bertine McGrath
  5. In the same box, select Type Title Here and type Chief Financial Officer (CFO)
  6. Click in the text box under the CEO and type Alfred Toth
  7. In the same box, select Type Title Here and type Chief Operating Officer (COO)
  8. Click in the most right text box and type Christine Essomo
  9. In the same box, select Type Title Here and type Chief Technology Officer (CTO)
  10. Click a white area in the window
     
  11. On the main menu of Microsoft Organization Chart, click File -> Close and Return to College Park Auto Shop1
  12. When a message box asks you whether you want to save the change, click Yes
  13. To continue with more personnel to the chart, double-click it
  14. To add more personnel to the chart, on the toolbar of Microsoft Organization Chart, click Assistant
  15. Click Paul Maestro
     
  16. Type Joceline Sinclair and press Enter
  17. Type Exec Admin Assistant
  18. Right-click Paul Maestro and click Color...
  19. In the Color dialog box, click a dark blue color (bottom section - 1st row - 5th column) and click OK
  20. While the CEO box is still selected, on the main menu, click Text -> Font...
  21. In the Font dialog box, change the font to Arial, Bold, Size=16 and click OK
  22. While the CEO box is still selected, on the main menu, click Text -> Color... In the Color dialog box, click the white color (top section - 1st row - 2nd column) and click OK
  23. Right-click Paul Maestro, position the mouse on Border Style and click the last box under None
  24. Right-click Paul Maestro, position the mouse on Shadow and click the box on the right side of None
  25. Right-click Paul Maestro and click Border Color. In the Color dialog box, click the white color (top section - 1st row - 2nd column) and click OK
  26. Format the other boxes as you see fit
     
  27. On the main menu of Microsoft Organization Chart, click File -> Exit and Return to College Park Auto Shop1
  28. When a message box asks you whether you want to save the change, click Yes
  29. Resize the chart to occupy most of the body of the slides
     
  30. Save the presentation and view it
  31. Close Microsoft PowerPoint

MOUS Topics

 
S32 Create tables within PowerPoint
 

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