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Sorting Records

 

Fundamentals of Sorting Records

 

Introduction

The list of records we get with a SELECT statement is presented in the order the records appear in the table. The SQL allows you to arrange records in alphabetical order, in chronological order, or in numeric incremental order. After selecting a series of columns, you may want to list the records following an arrangement from one specific field.

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Introducing Sorting Records

  1. Start the computer and log in
  2. Launch Microsoft SQL Server and click Connect
  3. In the Object Explorer, expand Databases
  4. From the previous lesson, make you have the FunDS1 database.
    In the Object Explorer, expand FunDS1 and expand Tables
  5. Right-click Inventory.StoreItems and click Edit Top 200 Rows
  6. On the Query Designer toolbar, click the Show Diagram Pane button Show Diagram Pane, the Show Criteria Pane button Show Criteria Pane, and the Show SQL Pane button Show SQL Pane
  7. In the Diagram pane, remove the check boxes of all fields
  8. In the SQL pane, delete TOP (200)
  9. In the Diagram pane, click the check boxes of ItemNumber (you may receive a message box; read it and click OK, then click the ItemNumber check box again), ItemName, and UnitPrice
  10. On the main menu, click Query Designer -> Execute SQL
Introducing Sorting Records

Visually Sorting Records

To get an alphabetical or an incremental order of records, you must let the database engine know what field would be used as reference. To visually specify the order, if you are using a Query window or the Query Designer:

  • In the Diagram pane, right-click a field and select either Sort Ascending or Sort Descending
  • In the Criteria pane, under the Sort Type column, click the corresponding box of the desired column. This would reveal that it is a combo box. Click the arrow of that combo box and make your selection:

Using the Table Window

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Visually Sorting Records

  1. In the Criteria pane, under Column, click ItemName and press Tab 4 times
  2. Type a and press Tab. Make sure it displays Ascending

Sorting Records in the SQL

Sorting Records

In SQL, to specify the sorting order, add the ORDER BY expression after the name of the table. The formula used would be:

SELECT WhatField(s) FROM WhatObject 
ORDER BY WhatField;

The column used as the basis must be recognized as part of the selected columns.

The SQL supports two orders of sorting: ascending or descending orders. If you arrange the records in SQL and use ORDER BY followed only by the name of the column, the records would be arranged in ascending order, which is the default. Otherwise, to explicitly specify that you want to arrange the records in ascending order, add the ASC keyword after the name of the column. The formula to use is:

SELECT WhatField(s) FROM WhatObject ORDER BY WhatField ASC;

If you are working in the Query Designer, to arrange the records in ascending order:

  • In the Diagram pane, right-click the desired field and click Sort Ascending
  • In the Criteria pane, after selecting a column, click the box at the intersection of that column and Sort Type, and select Ascending

The reverse of arranging the records normally is the descending order. If you are working in the Query Designer, to arrange the records in ascending order:

  • In the Diagram pane, right-click the desired field and click Sort Descending
  • In the Criteria pane, after identifyng the desired column, click the box at the intersection of that column and Sort Type, and select Descending

If you are arranging the records using code, you must explicitly indicate that you want to arranging in descending order. This is done by adding the DESC keyword after the name of the column. The formula to use is:

SELECT WhatField(s) FROM WhatObject ORDER BY WhatField DESC;

As we will see in the next sections, when sorting the records, the result you will get depend on the (data) type of (the) column.

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Sorting Records in the SQL

  1. In the SQL pane, observe the statement as it includes ORDER BY.
    On the main menu, click Query Designer -> Execute SQL
     
    Sorting Records
  2. In the Criteria pane, click Column to select all fields and press Delete

Sorting Records Based on Type

 

Sorting Null Fields

We already know that some fields can hold a value or be null, which would indicate that such a field has no value. As mentioned already, to sort records, you must specify the column by which you are sorting. If some records of that field are null, those records would be selected first. Here is an example:

SELECT * FROM Registration.Students
ORDER BY LastName;
GO

This would produce:

Sorting Records

On the other hand, if you sort the records in descending order, the non-null records would come first.

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Sorting NULL Fields

  1. In the Diagram pane, click the check boxes of ItemNumber, Manufacturer, and UnitPrice
  2. In the Criteria pane, click the box at the intersection of Manufacturer and Sort Type. Select Ascending
  3. On the main menu, click Query Designer -> Execute SQL
  4. In the Results pane, in the Manufacturer column, notice that the records with NULL come up first. Scroll down to see the non-NULL fields:
     
    Sorting Records

Sorting String-Based Fields

If you sort the records based on a column that uses plain text (char, varchar, varchar(max) and their variants nchar, nvarchar, and nvarchar(max)), the database engine would refer to the language used by the database. If the language is latin-based, which is the default in US English, the records would be arranged in alphabetical order based on the indicated column.

Here is an example that gives a list of students based on the students numbers:

SELECT StudentNumber,
       FirstName, 
       LastName, 
       Gender, 
       ParentsNames, 
       SingleParentHome
FROM   Registration.Students
ORDER BY StudentNumber;
GO

This would produce:

Sorting Records

As mentioned already, if the column has null values, their records would come first. Also, you can add the ASC keyword to re-enforce the idea that you want to sort the records in ascending order.

To reverse an ascending arrangement, add the DESC keyword after the name of the column. Here is an example:

SELECT FirstName,
       LastName,
       Gender,
       ParentsNames,
       SingleParentHome
FROM   Registration.Students
ORDER BY LastName DESC;
GO

This would produce:

Sorting Records

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Sorting String-Based Fields

  1. In the Criteria pane, click Manufacturer. Then click the arrow of its combo box and select ItemName
     
    Selecting a Column in the Criteria Pane
  2. Right-click inside the Diagram pane and click Execute SQL:
     
    Sorting Records

Sorting Boolean Fields

Boolean fields are those that use 0 (false) and 1 (true) values. If you arrange a list based on such a field, the NULL records would come first, followed by records with a 0 value, and followed by records with 1. Here is an example:

USE master;
GO
CREATE DATABASE Exercise10;
GO
USE Exercise10;
GO
CREATE TABLE Videos(Title nvarchar(50), [Length] int,
	Rating nchar(10), [Year] int, WideScreen bit);
GO
INSERT INTO Videos
VALUES(N'Last Castle (The)', 133, N'R', 2001, 1);
GO
INSERT INTO Videos(Title, [Length], [Year])
VALUES(N'Sex, Lies, and Videotape', 99, 1989);
GO
INSERT INTO Videos(Title, [Length], [Year], WideScreen)
VALUES(N'American President (The)', 115, 1995, 0);
GO
INSERT INTO Videos(Title, WideScreen, Rating)
VALUES(N'Day After Tomorrow (The)', 1, N'PG-13');
GO
INSERT INTO Videos(Title, [Length], Rating, WideScreen)
VALUES(N'Sneakers', 126, N'PG-13', 1);
GO

SELECT * FROM Videos
ORDER BY WideScreen;
GO

This would produce:

Sorting Records

If you sort the records in descending order, the records with 1 value would come up first, followed by those with 0, and then the NULL values.

Sorting Number-Based Fields

As you may know already, the SQL supports various types of numeric values. The columns that use those values can be sorted in incremental order. The SQL interpreter uses the rules specified in the Control Panel. For example, in US English, the referenced number is 0. Then there are negative and positive values. Of course, negative values come before 0 and positive values come after.

As seen with other types, if you sort the records based on a number-based column, if that column has null records, those records would come first. The other records would be sorted in increment order. Here is an example:

SELECT * FROM Videos
ORDER BY [Year];
GO

This would produce:

Sorting Records

Of course, to sort the records in decrementing order, apply the DESC keyword after the name of the column.

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Sorting Number-Based Fields

  1. In the Criteria pane, click ItemName. Then press Tab four times to select Ascending and press Delete
  2. Press the down arrow key and type a. Make sure ascending has been selected for the UnitPrice field
  3. On the main menu, click Query Designer -> Execute SQL:
     
    Sorting Records
  4. In the Criteria pane, click Column to select all columns
  5. Press Delete
  6. In the Diagram pane, click the check boxes of ItemNumber, DateEntered, ItemName, and UnitPrice
  7. In the Criteria pane, click the first box under Alias and type Item #
  8. Press the down arrow key and type Date Entered
  9. Press the down arrow key and type Name/Description
  10. Press the down arrow key and type Unit Price

Sorting Date and Time-Based Fields

The SQL supports date, time, and combinations of date and time values. When you sort records based on a column that uses one of Transact-SQL date-based types (date, time, datetime, smalldate, or datetime2), the SQL interpreter must be able to identify each date/time value. Fortunately, the database engine will have validated each date/time value and reject those that were not valid.

As seen for the other data types, if you sort records based on a column that uses a date/time type and if the column has null values, the records with null values would show first. The values of a date/time field are sorted in chronological orders. As a result:

  • If the values are used date values only, the records that occur first would also be the first to come up, incrementally. Here is an example:
    USE master;
    GO
    CREATE DATABASE IceCreamFactory;
    GO
    USE IceCreamFactory;
    GO
    CREATE SCHEMA IceCream;
    GO
    CREATE TABLE IceCream.Orders
    (
    	OrderID int identity(1, 1) not null,
    	OrderDate date not null, OrderTime time null
    );
    GO
    INSERT IceCream.Orders(OrderDate, OrderTime)
    VALUES(N'2011-02-14', N'10:12'), (N'2011-02-15', N'09:08'),
          (N'2011-05-10', N'15:24'), (N'2011-07-04', N'14:01'),
          (N'2011-04-18', N'19:16'), (N'2011-04-18', N'09:15'),
          (N'2011-04-18', N'12:48'), (N'2011-07-04', N'11:26');
    GO
    SELECT OrderID, OrderDate FROM IceCream.Orders
    ORDER BY OrderDate;
    GO

    This would produce

    Sorting Records

  • If the values are time-based only, the first thing to check is whether the table also includes another column that uses date values. If the table has only time values, the database engine would (or may) consider that all time values occur on the same day. In that case (or if that's the case), if you sort the records on the column that has the time values, the values closer to 0:01 AM would first appear, then the values that occur closer to 23:59 (midnight) on the same day would appear last. Here is an example:
    USE master;
    GO
    CREATE DATABASE IceCreamFactory2;
    GO
    USE IceCreamFactory2;
    GO
    CREATE SCHEMA IceCream;
    GO
    CREATE TABLE IceCream.Orders
    (
    	OrderID int identity(1, 1) not null,
    	OrderTime time not null
    );
    GO
    INSERT IceCream.Orders(OrderTime)
    VALUES(N'10:12'), (N'09:08'), (N'15:24'), (N'14:01'),
          (N'19:16'), (N'10:12'), (N'12:48'), (N'11:26');
    GO
    SELECT OrderID, OrderTime FROM IceCream.Orders
    ORDER BY OrderTime;
    GO

    This would produce:

    Sorting Records

  • If the values are combinations of date and time values, if some records occur on the same day but at different times, the records would be sorted based on time. That is, the records with similar dates would be grouped; then inside a group, the records are sorted by time. Consider the following example:
    USE master;
    GO
    CREATE DATABASE IceCreamFactory3;
    GO
    USE IceCreamFactory3;
    GO
    CREATE SCHEMA IceCream;
    GO
    CREATE TABLE IceCream.Orders
    (
    	OrderID int identity(1, 1) not null,
    	OrderDate datetime not null
    );
    GO
    INSERT IceCream.Orders(OrderDate)
    VALUES(N'2011-02-14 10:12'), (N'2011-02-15 09:08'),
          (N'2011-05-10 15:24'), (N'2011-07-04 14:01'),
          (N'2011-04-18 19:16'), (N'2011-04-18 10:12'),
          (N'2011-04-18 12:48'), (N'2011-07-04 11:26');
    GO
    SELECT OrderID, OrderDate FROM IceCream.Orders
    ORDER BY OrderDate;
    GO

    This would produce:

    Sorting Records

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Using Alias Names

  1. In the Criteria pane, click the box at the intersection of DateEntered and Sort Type, select Ascending
  2. Right-click somewhere in the window and click Execute SQL
  3. Notice that, in the [Date Entered] column, the NULL records come up first.
    Scroll down to see the other records
     
    Selecting a Column in the Criteria Section
 
 
 

Sorting More Than One Column

 

Introduction

Consider the following table:

USE Exercise;
GO
CREATE TABLE Employees([Empl #] nchar(10), [First Name] nvarchar(20),
	[Last Name] nvarchar(20), Salary money, [Full Time?] bit);
GO
INSERT INTO Employees
VALUES(N'29730', N'Philippe', N'Addy', 20.05, 1);
GO
INSERT INTO Employees([Empl #], [First Name], [Last Name], Salary)
VALUES(N'28084', N'Joan', N'Shepherd', 12.72);
GO
INSERT INTO Employees([Empl #], [First Name], [Last Name], Salary)
VALUES(N'79272', N'Joshua', N'Anderson', 18.26);
GO
INSERT INTO Employees
VALUES(N'22803', N'Gregory', N'Swanson', 15.95, 0);
GO
INSERT INTO Employees([Empl #], [Last Name], Salary, [Full Time?])
VALUES(N'28084', N'Shepherd', 12.72, 1),
      (N'39742', N'Anders', 8.88, 0);
GO
INSERT INTO Employees
VALUES(N'83084', N'Josephine', N'Anderson', 20.02, 1);
GO
INSERT INTO Employees([Empl #], [First Name], [Last Name], Salary)
VALUES(N'79272', N'James', N'Anders', 18.26),
      (N'27924', N'Gregory', N'Hope', 12.85),
      (N'39742', N'John', N'Anderson', 8.88);
GO
SELECT * FROM Employees;
GO

This would produce:

Sorting Records

Imagine you want to arrange the list based on salaries, you would execute a statement as:

SELECT [Empl #], [First Name], [Last Name], [Salary],
CASE [Full Time?]
	WHEN 0 THEN N'Contractor'
	WHEN 1 THEN N'Full Time'
	ELSE N'Unspecified'
END AS [Employment Status]
FROM Employees
ORDER BY [Salary];
GO

This would produce:

Sorting Records

Notice that some records have the same salaries. If you get a situation where many records on a column have the same value, you can specify an additional column by which to sort the records.

To visually sort by more than one column, in the Criteria pane, click the Sort Type corresponding to the first column and select the desired option. To specify the subsequent column, click the box corresponding to its Sort Type and select the desired option. To keep track of the columns you are using, in the Sort Order column, the database engine would create an incrementing number for each. The first column receives the number 1, the second receives the number 2, and so on. Here is an example:

Sorting Order

If you don't like the order suggested, click the Sort Order box corresponding to the column whose position you want to change, then click the arrow of its combo box and select the desired number:

Sorting Order

After making your selection, the studio would update the order of sorting columns.

To arrange the list using more than one column using the SQL, after ORDER BY, type the columns separated by commas.

Sorting Non-NULL and NULL Fields

If you specify more than one record to sort by, the database engine sorts the primary column first. Then, on the second field, when two records have the same value, the NULL values would come first. Here is an example:

SELECT [Empl #], [First Name], [Last Name], [Salary], [Full Time?]
FROM Employees
ORDER BY [Salary], [Full Time?];
GO

This would produce:

Sorting Records

Notice that when two records have the same values and if one of the records has a NULL value, that one comes first.

Sorting Two String-Based Columns

Imagine you have two string-based records that have the same value. If you sort them, you would wonder which one would come up first. An additional field would solve this problem. That is, you can combine fields to sort the records. Here is an example:

SELECT [Empl #], [First Name], [Last Name], [Salary],
CASE [Full Time?]
	WHEN 0 THEN N'No'
	WHEN 1 THEN N'Yes'
	ELSE N'Don''t Know'
END AS [Employment Status]
FROM Employees
ORDER BY [Last Name], [First Name];
GO

If you do this, the SQL interpreter would first sort the records based on the first field, in which case the records would be grouped. It is then the second field that would be used to handle the assignment. In other words, using the alphabetical order, the value that comes first would be based on the alphabet, such as US English. The above statement would produce:

Using the SQL to Sort Records

Notice that, when you sort more than one string-based fields, the records with NULL values come first, such is the case for the above Anders and the Shepherd records. For the fields that are not null, the records are sorted based on the second records; that's the case for the Anderson records.

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Sorting More Than One Column

  1. In the Criteria pane, under Column, click DateEntered. Then click the arrow of its combo box and select Manufacturer
  2. Press Tab and press Delete to remove the alias
  3. Still in the Criteria pane, click the box at the intersection of ItemName and Sort Type. Select Ascending and press Tab. Observe the statement in the SQL pane:
    SELECT ItemNumber AS [Item #], Manufacturer,
           ItemName AS [Name/Description], UnitPrice AS [Unit Price]
    FROM   Inventory.StoreItems
    ORDER BY Manufacturer, [Name/Description]
  4. Right-click somewhere in the window and click Execute SQL
  5. Notice that, in the Manufacturer column, the NULL records come first.
    Scroll down in the Results pane to locate records that have the same manufacturer. Notice that it is their Name/Description column that handles the sorting:
     
    Sorting With More Than One Column

Sorting Two Date/Time-Based Columns

As you may know already, Transact-SQL supports records that use date only, time only, or a combination of date and time values. When sorting the records, you can combine the fields to get a certain appreciation of the distribution of records. If you have records that occur at different dates, the sorting is easy.

Imagine you have records that occur on the same day but at different times, if you have all dates and times on the same column, you can sort by only that column and the database engine would take care of the rest. We saw an example already.

If you have one column that holds date values but another field that records the times, you can first sort by the date column, followed by the time field. Here is an example:

USE master;
GO
CREATE DATABASE IceCreamFactory1;
GO
USE IceCreamFactory1;
GO
CREATE SCHEMA IceCream;
GO
CREATE TABLE IceCream.Orders
(
	OrderID int identity(1, 1) not null,
	OrderDate date not null,
	OrderTime time not null
);
GO
INSERT IceCream.Orders(OrderDate, OrderTime)
VALUES(N'2011-02-14', N'10:12'), (N'2011-02-15', N'09:08'),
      (N'2011-05-10', N'15:24'), (N'2011-07-04', N'14:01'),
      (N'2011-04-18', N'19:16'), (N'2011-04-18', N'10:12'),
      (N'2011-04-18', N'12:48'), (N'2011-07-04', N'11:26');
GO
SELECT OrderID, OrderDate, OrderTime FROM IceCream.Orders
ORDER BY OrderDate, OrderTime;
GO

In this case, the records of the date column would be sorted first, which means the records would be grouped by day. In other words, records that occur on the same day would be put in the same range. Then, when some records occur on the same day, the records of the time field would be sorted in chronological order. The above code would produce:

Using the SQL to Sort Records

Notice the records registered on 2011-04-18 and 2011-07-04. It's the values of OrderTime field that determine the sorting.

Sorting the Records With Ties

Consider the following table and its records:

CREATE TABLE Videos
(
	[Shelf #] nchar(7) null,
	Title nvarchar(50) not null,
	Director nvarchar(50),
	[Length] int,
	Rating nchar(10),
	[Year] int
);
GO

INSERT INTO Videos
VALUES(N'DHE-927', N'Two for the Money', N'D.J. Caruso', 123, N'R', 2008),
      (N'CGM-683', N'Her Alibi', N'Bruce Beresford', 94, N'PG-13', 1998),
      (N'FQT-973', N'Memoirs of a Geisha', N'Rob Marshall', 145, N'PG-13', 2006),
      (N'DBT-395', N'Wall Street', N'Oliver Stone', 126, N'R', 2000);
      
GO
INSERT INTO Videos(Title, Director, [Length], Rating)
VALUES(N'Stealing Harvard', N'Bruce McCulloch', 85, N'PG-13');
GO

INSERT INTO Videos([Shelf #], Title, Director, [Length], [Year])
VALUES(N'TPH-973', N'A Few Good Men', N'Rob Reiner', 138, 1992);
GO

INSERT INTO Videos(Title, Director, [Year], [Length])
VALUES(N'The Silence of the Lambs', N'Jonathan Demme', 1991, 118);
GO

INSERT INTO Videos([Shelf #], Title, Director, Rating, [Length])
VALUES(N'DZV-737', N'The Lady Killers', N'Joel Coen & Ethan Coen', N'R', 104);
GO

INSERT INTO Videos(Title, Director, [Length],  Rating, [Year])
VALUES(N'Sneakers', N'Phil Alden Robinson', 126, N'PG-13', 1992),
      (N'Annie', N'John Huston', 126, N'G', 1982),
      (N'Dave', N'Ivan Reitman', 110, N'PG-13', 1993);
GO

INSERT INTO Videos
VALUES(N'ADR-737', N'Incredibles (The)', N'Brad Bird', 133, N'PG', 2004);
GO

As we have seen so far, to get the list of all records, you would execute:

SELECT * FROM Videos;

Videos

Notice that the statement produces 12 records. To get the first 40% records, you would execute:

SELECT TOP 40 PERCENT *
FROM Videos;
GO

Videos

Notice that you get 5 records that include 3 with a PG-13 rating. If you want to arrange the list based on the Rating column, you can add the ORDER BY clause as follows:

SELECT TOP 40 PERCENT *
FROM Videos
ORDER BY Rating;
GO

Videos

Notice that you still get 5 records but this time, only one is with PG-13 and the PG-13 record is the last. Transact-SQL provides an operation that associates with the ORDER BY statement and the TOP PERCENT value. The operation works as follows:

  1. First select the top expression percent records
  2. Second, based on the column used by the ORDER BY clause, show all records that use the value of that column, even if the result will produce more records than the specified percent value

To visually perform this operation, in the Object Explorer, right-click the table or view and click Edit Top 200 Rows. Include at least either the Criteria pane or the SQL pane.

In either the Criteria pane or the SQL pane, set the order of your choice (ascending or descending) for the column that will hold the arrangement. Here is an example:

Videos

In the Properties window, expand the Top Specification field and make sure its (Top) field is set to Yes (it should be set already). In the Expression field, enter the value you want. Set the Percent field to Yes. Set the With Ties field to Yes. Here is an example:

Expression

Once these are done, you can execute the statement:

Videos

In Transact-SQL, the formula to perform the above operation is:

SELECT TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] [ WITH TIES ]
What Columns
FROM Object
ORDER BY Column

The WITH TIES clause asks the SELECT statement to perform the two operations we saw aboce. The WITH TIES expression is entered after the PERCENT keyword, which is before the list of columns. Here is an example:

SELECT TOP 40 PERCENT WITH TIES *
FROM Videos
ORDER BY Rating;
GO

This would produce:

Videos

Consequently, the WITH TIES condition is used to select the top percent records plus all records that use the value of the last record depending on the column specified by the ORDER BY clause.

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Closing the Lesson

  1. Close the Query Designer

Exercises

   

Lesson Summary Questions

  1. What is the basic formula to sort the records of a table?
    1. EXECUTE SELECT WhatField(s) FROM WhatObject 
      SORT WhatField;
    2. SELECT WhatField(s) FROM WhatObject 
      ORDER BY WhatField;
    3. FROM WhatObject SELECT WhatField(s) 
      SORT WITH WhatField;
    4. SELECT WhatField(s) FROM WhatObject 
      EXECUTE sp_sort(WhatField);
    5. EXECUTE SORT(SELECT WhatField(s) FROM WhatObject);
  2. What is the SQL word used to sort records in alphabetical, chronological, or increment values?
    1. ASCENDING
    2. DEFAULT
    3. DESCENDING
    4. ASC
    5. DESC
  3. What is the SQL word used to sort records in reverse alphabetical, reverse chronological, or decrement values?
    1. ASC
    2. DESC
    3. ASCENDING
    4. DESCENDING
    5. SORT DOWN
  4. What is the formula to specify that only the first percentage of record be produced from a query?
    1. SELECT TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] [ WITH TIES ]
      What Columns
      FROM Object
      ORDER BY Column
    2. WITH TIES SELECT TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] [ ]
      What Columns
      FROM Object
      ORDER BY Column
    3. SELECT TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] [ WITH TIES ]
      SORT(Column)
      What Columns
      FROM Object
    4. SORT(SELECT TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] [ WITH TIES ])
      What Columns
      FROM Object
    5. SELECT TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] 
      What Columns
      FROM Object
      ORDER BY Column
      [ WITH TIES ]

Answers

  1. Answers
    1. Wrong Answer
    2. Right Answer: To sort the records, use ORDER BY
    3. Wrong Answer
    4. Wrong Answer
    5. Wrong Answer
  2. Answers
    1. Wrong Answer
    2. Wrong Answer
    3. Wrong Answer
    4. Right Answer: To sort the records in ascending order, use ASC
    5. Wrong Answer
  3. Answers
    1. Wrong Answer
    2. Right Answer: To sort the records in reverse order, use DESC
    3. Wrong Answer
    4. Wrong Answer
    5. Wrong Answer
  4. Answers
    1. Wrong Answer
    2. Right Answer: To sort the records in reverse order, use DESC
    3. Wrong Answer
    4. Wrong Answer
    5. Wrong Answer
 
 
       
 

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